Contemporary performances of medieval mystery plays: The effect of mentalities on performance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291959
Title:
Contemporary performances of medieval mystery plays: The effect of mentalities on performance
Author:
Smith, James Kenneth
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines contemporary British productions of medieval mystery plays, specifically questioning how cultural mentality affects such productions. Because of the distance between the medieval and contemporary British mentalities, a cultural gap exists between original texts and contemporary productions. This gap creates, for audiences, a "double vision," a perception of both the medieval mentality that informed the original text and the contemporary mentality that performs it. Contemporary productions tend to attempt to diminish this inherent "double vision" in a variety of ways, including making the production authentic to medieval practice or by adapting the medieval texts. This thesis analyzes two contemporary productions of medieval mystery plays, the 1998 revival of the York Mysteries, directed by Jane Oakshott, and The Mysteries, a contemporary adaptation of several medieval cycles, written by Tony Harrison and directed by Bill Bryden, exploring the methods used by both to tackle the mentality gap.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Theater.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Theatre Arts
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hohman, Valleri J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleContemporary performances of medieval mystery plays: The effect of mentalities on performanceen_US
dc.creatorSmith, James Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, James Kennethen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines contemporary British productions of medieval mystery plays, specifically questioning how cultural mentality affects such productions. Because of the distance between the medieval and contemporary British mentalities, a cultural gap exists between original texts and contemporary productions. This gap creates, for audiences, a "double vision," a perception of both the medieval mentality that informed the original text and the contemporary mentality that performs it. Contemporary productions tend to attempt to diminish this inherent "double vision" in a variety of ways, including making the production authentic to medieval practice or by adapting the medieval texts. This thesis analyzes two contemporary productions of medieval mystery plays, the 1998 revival of the York Mysteries, directed by Jane Oakshott, and The Mysteries, a contemporary adaptation of several medieval cycles, written by Tony Harrison and directed by Bill Bryden, exploring the methods used by both to tackle the mentality gap.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHohman, Valleri J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1420178en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4670839xen_US
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