Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291957
Title:
Open records in Arizona: How much information is too much?
Author:
Ousley, Christopher Allen, 1969-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis examines conflicts concerning public access to government records. By examining the beginning, evolution and current state of public records access in America, and specifically in Arizona, this thesis explores the question, "How much access to personal information contained in government records is too much?" It is my thesis that American democracy cannot survive without open government records. Open government records, including voter records, educational records, motor vehicle records, property tax records and real estate records, allow citizens to keep informed concerning government matters and to oversee the conduct of government employees and elected officials. American democracy is based upon this oversight by citizens. Without public access to government records, the principles of democracy would be undermined and freedoms eroded. This thesis concludes that the citizen's right to know, though not a constitutional right, is a right that Americans must protect to ensure a strong democracy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Journalism.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Journalism
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mangelsdorf, Philip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOpen records in Arizona: How much information is too much?en_US
dc.creatorOusley, Christopher Allen, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorOusley, Christopher Allen, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines conflicts concerning public access to government records. By examining the beginning, evolution and current state of public records access in America, and specifically in Arizona, this thesis explores the question, "How much access to personal information contained in government records is too much?" It is my thesis that American democracy cannot survive without open government records. Open government records, including voter records, educational records, motor vehicle records, property tax records and real estate records, allow citizens to keep informed concerning government matters and to oversee the conduct of government employees and elected officials. American democracy is based upon this oversight by citizens. Without public access to government records, the principles of democracy would be undermined and freedoms eroded. This thesis concludes that the citizen's right to know, though not a constitutional right, is a right that Americans must protect to ensure a strong democracy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectJournalism.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMangelsdorf, Philipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383575en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34607663en_US
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