The illusion of masculine independence in the Carolina Piedmont: Women, work and wages through the transition from farm to factory, 1880-1930

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291955
Title:
The illusion of masculine independence in the Carolina Piedmont: Women, work and wages through the transition from farm to factory, 1880-1930
Author:
Speagle, Lori L.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis draws on oral histories to explore the lives of the Carolina Piedmont's farm to factory families from the 1880s through 1930s. Utilizing gender and race as analytical tools, it examines how women lived everyday life on the farm and in the mill, how the blurring of the sexual division of labor by women challenged southern farming masculinity that was protected by gendered language and public silence, and how social and economic changes in the mill undermined the language and silence of the farm. In so doing, this thesis provides an understanding of the farm to factory adjustment within the context of an examination of masculinity as an historical, ideological process. As cultural conceptions of masculinity changed with economic shifts from subsistence farming to commercial agriculture to millwork, women's cash-producing work, which had been hidden on the farm, was made visible by a daily wage in the mill.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Anderson, Karen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe illusion of masculine independence in the Carolina Piedmont: Women, work and wages through the transition from farm to factory, 1880-1930en_US
dc.creatorSpeagle, Lori L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSpeagle, Lori L.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis draws on oral histories to explore the lives of the Carolina Piedmont's farm to factory families from the 1880s through 1930s. Utilizing gender and race as analytical tools, it examines how women lived everyday life on the farm and in the mill, how the blurring of the sexual division of labor by women challenged southern farming masculinity that was protected by gendered language and public silence, and how social and economic changes in the mill undermined the language and silence of the farm. In so doing, this thesis provides an understanding of the farm to factory adjustment within the context of an examination of masculinity as an historical, ideological process. As cultural conceptions of masculinity changed with economic shifts from subsistence farming to commercial agriculture to millwork, women's cash-producing work, which had been hidden on the farm, was made visible by a daily wage in the mill.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1416937en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44666949en_US
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