Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291940
Title:
Marriage transaction in contemporary China
Author:
Fang, Ying, 1965-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis challenges the notion that China was a dowry society. The majority of the population before 1949 practiced indirect dowry, which is the goods originated from the groom's family as brideprice and terminated in the new conjugal household as dowry, after a possible deduction by the bride's father. In post-revolutionary China the brideprice component of indirect dowry was elaborated as a result of change in social and economic structures. In post-revolutionary China, brideprice prevails in rural areas and "thoussaou" dominates in urban areas. Household structure, unit of production, patrilocality in addition to women's labor value contribute to the different practices. Household structure may determine the form of marriage transaction in spite of the existence of other factors. The strong correlation between women's high labor value and brideprice does not hold true every time. Neolocal residence and nuclear family should be advocated if brideprice is to be eliminated.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schlegel, Alice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMarriage transaction in contemporary Chinaen_US
dc.creatorFang, Ying, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Ying, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis challenges the notion that China was a dowry society. The majority of the population before 1949 practiced indirect dowry, which is the goods originated from the groom's family as brideprice and terminated in the new conjugal household as dowry, after a possible deduction by the bride's father. In post-revolutionary China the brideprice component of indirect dowry was elaborated as a result of change in social and economic structures. In post-revolutionary China, brideprice prevails in rural areas and "thoussaou" dominates in urban areas. Household structure, unit of production, patrilocality in addition to women's labor value contribute to the different practices. Household structure may determine the form of marriage transaction in spite of the existence of other factors. The strong correlation between women's high labor value and brideprice does not hold true every time. Neolocal residence and nuclear family should be advocated if brideprice is to be eliminated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchlegel, Aliceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1340257en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26239486en_US
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