Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291933
Title:
Creation of an identity: American Indian protest art
Author:
Kaufmann, Laurel Jeanne, 1966-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis addresses and critically reviews American Indian protest art as a legitimate art genre. Brief discussions of the Studio (the first formal American Indian art school), the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), and the American Indian protest movements of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as irony, satire, and humor in Indian art are included. The concept of the "Indian" identity as a motivating factor of the art, and the redundant use of stereotypical imagery as it relates to cultural conflicts are addressed. Descriptive interpretations of the art of David Bradley, Alex Jacobs, and Stan Natchez, and the three fundamental elements of this art style are presented in detail.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Art History.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ivey, Paul E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCreation of an identity: American Indian protest arten_US
dc.creatorKaufmann, Laurel Jeanne, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaufmann, Laurel Jeanne, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses and critically reviews American Indian protest art as a legitimate art genre. Brief discussions of the Studio (the first formal American Indian art school), the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), and the American Indian protest movements of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as irony, satire, and humor in Indian art are included. The concept of the "Indian" identity as a motivating factor of the art, and the redundant use of stereotypical imagery as it relates to cultural conflicts are addressed. Descriptive interpretations of the art of David Bradley, Alex Jacobs, and Stan Natchez, and the three fundamental elements of this art style are presented in detail.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectArt History.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorIvey, Paul E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356798en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b33619359en_US
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