Acquaintance rape: Attribution of blame as a function of respondent's sex, attitudes toward women and heterosexual relationships, and acceptance of interpersonal violence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291931
Title:
Acquaintance rape: Attribution of blame as a function of respondent's sex, attitudes toward women and heterosexual relationships, and acceptance of interpersonal violence
Author:
Seiverd, Kari Diane, 1965-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to investigate individual characteristics of college students (i.e., attitudes toward women and heterosexual relationships and acceptance of interpersonal violence) and ascertain the relationship between individual characteristics, gender, and attitudes toward attribution of blame in acquaintance rape. Whereas no instruments had been developed to measure attitudes toward attribution of blame in acquaintance rape, this study sought to create such a measure. Students from a large Southwestern university were utilized as participants (N = 159). Four dependent measures were employed: the Attitudes Toward Women Scale: Short Form, the Heterosexual Relationships Scale, the Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence Scale, and the contrived Attitudes of Acquaintance Rape Blame Scale (AARBS). Analyses of variance found that gender, sexist attitudes toward male-female relationships, traditional attitudes toward women, and high acceptance of interpersonal violence led to more traditional assignment of blame in cases of acquaintance rape (i.e., blame the woman).
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Acquaintance rape.; Sex role.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Erickson, Richard L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAcquaintance rape: Attribution of blame as a function of respondent's sex, attitudes toward women and heterosexual relationships, and acceptance of interpersonal violenceen_US
dc.creatorSeiverd, Kari Diane, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeiverd, Kari Diane, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to investigate individual characteristics of college students (i.e., attitudes toward women and heterosexual relationships and acceptance of interpersonal violence) and ascertain the relationship between individual characteristics, gender, and attitudes toward attribution of blame in acquaintance rape. Whereas no instruments had been developed to measure attitudes toward attribution of blame in acquaintance rape, this study sought to create such a measure. Students from a large Southwestern university were utilized as participants (N = 159). Four dependent measures were employed: the Attitudes Toward Women Scale: Short Form, the Heterosexual Relationships Scale, the Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence Scale, and the contrived Attitudes of Acquaintance Rape Blame Scale (AARBS). Analyses of variance found that gender, sexist attitudes toward male-female relationships, traditional attitudes toward women, and high acceptance of interpersonal violence led to more traditional assignment of blame in cases of acquaintance rape (i.e., blame the woman).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAcquaintance rape.en_US
dc.subjectSex role.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErickson, Richard L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336902en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22881778en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17518040en_US
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