Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291922
Title:
Age differences in forgetting false memories
Author:
Mojardin Heraldez, Ambrocio, 1963-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study replicated and extended the results of some recent studies concerned with the effects of repeated testing in false-memory creation (e.g. Brainerd and Reyna, 1996), and recent studies concerned with the persistence of false memories over time (Brainerd and Reyna, 1996; McDermott, 1996; Payne et al., 1996). One hundred and twenty children of ages 6, 9 and 12 listened to a series of sentences and took three recognition tests (Immediate, One-week, One-month). Participants made recognition decisions about four items: (1) targets, (2) distractors with the same meaning as targets but different words, (3) distractors with different meaning than targets, but the same words, and (4) distractors with different meaning than targets and different words. Analysis of variance of hits and false alarms showed effects of repeated testing on both. Stochastic dependency analyses showed greater long-term persistence for false alarms than for hits. The effects of testing repetition in creating false memories and the persistence of false memories increased with age. Results are discussed using Fuzzy-Trace Theory as a theoretical framework.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Cognitive.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brainerd, Charles J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAge differences in forgetting false memoriesen_US
dc.creatorMojardin Heraldez, Ambrocio, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMojardin Heraldez, Ambrocio, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study replicated and extended the results of some recent studies concerned with the effects of repeated testing in false-memory creation (e.g. Brainerd and Reyna, 1996), and recent studies concerned with the persistence of false memories over time (Brainerd and Reyna, 1996; McDermott, 1996; Payne et al., 1996). One hundred and twenty children of ages 6, 9 and 12 listened to a series of sentences and took three recognition tests (Immediate, One-week, One-month). Participants made recognition decisions about four items: (1) targets, (2) distractors with the same meaning as targets but different words, (3) distractors with different meaning than targets, but the same words, and (4) distractors with different meaning than targets and different words. Analysis of variance of hits and false alarms showed effects of repeated testing on both. Stochastic dependency analyses showed greater long-term persistence for false alarms than for hits. The effects of testing repetition in creating false memories and the persistence of false memories increased with age. Results are discussed using Fuzzy-Trace Theory as a theoretical framework.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrainerd, Charles J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1387709en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744094en_US
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