A quantitative comparison of finds from open-air and cave sites in the Western European Middle Paleolithic

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291920
Title:
A quantitative comparison of finds from open-air and cave sites in the Western European Middle Paleolithic
Author:
Jorstad, Susan Kay, 1951-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study looks at quantitative differences and similarities in diversity of archaeological finds (stone tools and animal bone) at two categories of Western European Middle Paleolithic sites: open-air and cave/rockshelters. Specifically, it tests the null hypothesis that there are no differences in (1) artifact diversity as measured using the Bordes typology; (2) faunal diversity as measured by number of taxa; and (3) the percentages of stone tools that fall into the categories of either denticulates/notches or intensively retouched pieces. All analyses are based on regressions of diversity against assemblage size. For lithic assemblages, the H0 of no differences in find diversity between site types is rejected for lithics when the full Bordes typology is employed, but not when retouched-only pieces are analyzed (excluding Bordes' types 1-3, 5, 38, and 45-50). Faunal data are equivocal. The H0 is also rejected for the dimension of percentages of heavily-retouched tools, but not for denticulates/notches.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kuhn, Steven

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA quantitative comparison of finds from open-air and cave sites in the Western European Middle Paleolithicen_US
dc.creatorJorstad, Susan Kay, 1951-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJorstad, Susan Kay, 1951-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study looks at quantitative differences and similarities in diversity of archaeological finds (stone tools and animal bone) at two categories of Western European Middle Paleolithic sites: open-air and cave/rockshelters. Specifically, it tests the null hypothesis that there are no differences in (1) artifact diversity as measured using the Bordes typology; (2) faunal diversity as measured by number of taxa; and (3) the percentages of stone tools that fall into the categories of either denticulates/notches or intensively retouched pieces. All analyses are based on regressions of diversity against assemblage size. For lithic assemblages, the H0 of no differences in find diversity between site types is rejected for lithics when the full Bordes typology is employed, but not when retouched-only pieces are analyzed (excluding Bordes' types 1-3, 5, 38, and 45-50). Faunal data are equivocal. The H0 is also rejected for the dimension of percentages of heavily-retouched tools, but not for denticulates/notches.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKuhn, Stevenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381790en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34294119en_US
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