Vocabulary instruction: Teacher perceptions and classroom observations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291918
Title:
Vocabulary instruction: Teacher perceptions and classroom observations
Author:
Miller, Susan Frances, 1962-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates the relationships between theory-based vocabulary research (Anderson and Freebody, 1981; Mezynski, 1983), teacher perceptions of the effectiveness and usability of twelve vocabulary strategies on a researcher-developed survey, and observations in content area classrooms during vocabulary instruction. Among the findings, the following are major: (1) Each hypothesis offers differing instructional implications for vocabulary instruction; (2) the responses on the survey indicate that strategies implied by the Knowledge Hypothesis are the most effective and strategies implied by the Instrumental Hypothesis are the most usable; (3) observations of five teachers indicate that observed behaviors, reported practices, and personal reports are inconsistent; and (4) triangulation of the three data sources reveals some consistency and some contradictions. Implications for future research, teacher education and practice are discussed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Vocabulary -- Study and teaching.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Anders, Patricia L.; Bos, Candace S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleVocabulary instruction: Teacher perceptions and classroom observationsen_US
dc.creatorMiller, Susan Frances, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Susan Frances, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the relationships between theory-based vocabulary research (Anderson and Freebody, 1981; Mezynski, 1983), teacher perceptions of the effectiveness and usability of twelve vocabulary strategies on a researcher-developed survey, and observations in content area classrooms during vocabulary instruction. Among the findings, the following are major: (1) Each hypothesis offers differing instructional implications for vocabulary instruction; (2) the responses on the survey indicate that strategies implied by the Knowledge Hypothesis are the most effective and strategies implied by the Instrumental Hypothesis are the most usable; (3) observations of five teachers indicate that observed behaviors, reported practices, and personal reports are inconsistent; and (4) triangulation of the three data sources reveals some consistency and some contradictions. Implications for future research, teacher education and practice are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectVocabulary -- Study and teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorBos, Candace S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332313en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18450762en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16557517en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.