Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291886
Title:
Jungian types of men in therapy
Author:
Creamer, William Henry Jr., 1953-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study assessed the differences between men in therapy and clinical and nonclinical samples reported in previous research. It identified the personality types of men currently in therapy using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It was expected that responses to the MBTI and identified types would differ from nonclinical and clinical samples previously reported. This distinguished and described those men seeking therapy from those who did not. The 135 men sampled were drawn from a variety of therapeutic settings in southern Arizona, including private and public hospitals, non-profit and profit agencies, and individual therapists. All subjects were 18 years of age or older and voluntarily agreed to participate. Men in therapy differed from both the general population and the population of men in psychiatric hospitals. They were more Introverted, Intuitive, Feeling, and Perceiving than the general population and more Extroverted, Intuitive, and Perceiving than the men in psychiatric hospitals.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Personality.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christensen, Oscar C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleJungian types of men in therapyen_US
dc.creatorCreamer, William Henry Jr., 1953-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCreamer, William Henry Jr., 1953-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the differences between men in therapy and clinical and nonclinical samples reported in previous research. It identified the personality types of men currently in therapy using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It was expected that responses to the MBTI and identified types would differ from nonclinical and clinical samples previously reported. This distinguished and described those men seeking therapy from those who did not. The 135 men sampled were drawn from a variety of therapeutic settings in southern Arizona, including private and public hospitals, non-profit and profit agencies, and individual therapists. All subjects were 18 years of age or older and voluntarily agreed to participate. Men in therapy differed from both the general population and the population of men in psychiatric hospitals. They were more Introverted, Intuitive, Feeling, and Perceiving than the general population and more Extroverted, Intuitive, and Perceiving than the men in psychiatric hospitals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Personality.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristensen, Oscar C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342957en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2662199xen_US
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