The education of a Native American anthropologist: Edward P. Dozier (1916-1971)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291860
Title:
The education of a Native American anthropologist: Edward P. Dozier (1916-1971)
Author:
Norcini, Marilyn Jane, 1950-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This is a documentary study of the formative years of Native American anthropologist, Edward P. Dozier (1916-1971). The research is based on the Edward P. Dozier Papers in the Arizona State Museum Archives, University of Arizona. Edward Pascual Dozier (Awa Tsideh) spent his early years, from his 1916 birth in Santa Clara Pueblo until his 1952 doctoral degree in anthropology, assimilating into the pluralistic society of the Southwest. Although enculturated as a Tewa, he also interacted with local Roman Catholic Hispanic communities in New Mexico. As a young man, Dozier encountered many aspects of Anglo American culture such as a formal education, wage work, and military service during World War II. His future development as a professional academic anthropologist specializing in Southwestern ethnology and linguistics was also influenced by his Anglo father Thomas Sublette Dozier, community studies researcher Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, and Santa Claran ethnographer Dr. W. W. Hill.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropologists -- United States -- Biography.; Dozier, Edward P. -- Biography.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Officer, James E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe education of a Native American anthropologist: Edward P. Dozier (1916-1971)en_US
dc.creatorNorcini, Marilyn Jane, 1950-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorcini, Marilyn Jane, 1950-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is a documentary study of the formative years of Native American anthropologist, Edward P. Dozier (1916-1971). The research is based on the Edward P. Dozier Papers in the Arizona State Museum Archives, University of Arizona. Edward Pascual Dozier (Awa Tsideh) spent his early years, from his 1916 birth in Santa Clara Pueblo until his 1952 doctoral degree in anthropology, assimilating into the pluralistic society of the Southwest. Although enculturated as a Tewa, he also interacted with local Roman Catholic Hispanic communities in New Mexico. As a young man, Dozier encountered many aspects of Anglo American culture such as a formal education, wage work, and military service during World War II. His future development as a professional academic anthropologist specializing in Southwestern ethnology and linguistics was also influenced by his Anglo father Thomas Sublette Dozier, community studies researcher Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, and Santa Claran ethnographer Dr. W. W. Hill.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropologists -- United States -- Biography.en_US
dc.subjectDozier, Edward P. -- Biography.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOfficer, James E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335057en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20802483en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17091172en_US
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