Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291857
Title:
Contemporary usage of the Blessingway ceremony for Navajo births
Author:
Hartle-Schutte, Maureen, 1952-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This ethnographic study investigates the frequency of use of the Navajo Blessingway ceremony during pregnancy by Navajo women in the Fort Defiance Service Unit of Indian Health Service. Through interviews with postpartum women and community members it was found that approximately 14% of the Navajo women at this hospital had a Blessingway ceremony during their current pregnancy. The data indicate that contemporary usage of the Blessingway ceremony is much less frequent than with previous generations. Factors contributing to this decline include a: decrease in the use of Navajo language, decreased number of practicing medicine men, increased reliance on Christian religions practices, influence of Western education and health care practices and changing socioeconomic conditions. The most significant factor in encouraging pregnant women to use this beneficial ceremony was the influence of the extended family.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Navajo Indians -- Rites and ceremonies.; Navajo Indians -- Religion.; Birth customs -- Southwest, New.; Navajo mythology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zepeda, Ofelia; Joe, Jennie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleContemporary usage of the Blessingway ceremony for Navajo birthsen_US
dc.creatorHartle-Schutte, Maureen, 1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHartle-Schutte, Maureen, 1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis ethnographic study investigates the frequency of use of the Navajo Blessingway ceremony during pregnancy by Navajo women in the Fort Defiance Service Unit of Indian Health Service. Through interviews with postpartum women and community members it was found that approximately 14% of the Navajo women at this hospital had a Blessingway ceremony during their current pregnancy. The data indicate that contemporary usage of the Blessingway ceremony is much less frequent than with previous generations. Factors contributing to this decline include a: decrease in the use of Navajo language, decreased number of practicing medicine men, increased reliance on Christian religions practices, influence of Western education and health care practices and changing socioeconomic conditions. The most significant factor in encouraging pregnant women to use this beneficial ceremony was the influence of the extended family.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNavajo Indians -- Rites and ceremonies.en_US
dc.subjectNavajo Indians -- Religion.en_US
dc.subjectBirth customs -- Southwest, New.en_US
dc.subjectNavajo mythology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZepeda, Ofeliaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJoe, Jennieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333236en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19349858en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1675878xen_US
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