From classical to Baroque: Inquiry about science in America, 1930-1990

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291856
Title:
From classical to Baroque: Inquiry about science in America, 1930-1990
Author:
Remington, John Alvah, 1942-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This essay offers an overview of the intellectual and social structures of science in the United States from the 1930s into the 1950s. It argues that Germanic immigrant scientists who fled the Nazis in the 1930s were vital in energizing a productive collegiality among scientists and reinvigorating a dialectical interplay between theorists and experimentalists, both of which characterize "classical" science. This unique intellectual contribution and the "internal dynamic" of doing science are described as becoming embedded in new social and ethical structures since World War II. New directions for research have been shaped by such "external" factors as the increased accountability of science, governmental mega-projects and secrecy, the enlarged dimension of "instrumentalities" in science, changes in social relationships in the laboratory, and changes in the expectations of the public. As a consequence, styles of doing science, the motivations of scientists, and theoretical/experimental interactions, all part of the "internal" dynamic of science, have been strained and transformed. The concluding chapter argues that the most appropriate designation for American science since the 1960s is not just "big." In the most expansive sense of the concept, it is Baroque.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; History, Modern.; History of Science.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Carter, Paul A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFrom classical to Baroque: Inquiry about science in America, 1930-1990en_US
dc.creatorRemington, John Alvah, 1942-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRemington, John Alvah, 1942-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis essay offers an overview of the intellectual and social structures of science in the United States from the 1930s into the 1950s. It argues that Germanic immigrant scientists who fled the Nazis in the 1930s were vital in energizing a productive collegiality among scientists and reinvigorating a dialectical interplay between theorists and experimentalists, both of which characterize "classical" science. This unique intellectual contribution and the "internal dynamic" of doing science are described as becoming embedded in new social and ethical structures since World War II. New directions for research have been shaped by such "external" factors as the increased accountability of science, governmental mega-projects and secrecy, the enlarged dimension of "instrumentalities" in science, changes in social relationships in the laboratory, and changes in the expectations of the public. As a consequence, styles of doing science, the motivations of scientists, and theoretical/experimental interactions, all part of the "internal" dynamic of science, have been strained and transformed. The concluding chapter argues that the most appropriate designation for American science since the 1960s is not just "big." In the most expansive sense of the concept, it is Baroque.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectHistory of Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Paul A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342671en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26592897en_US
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