Behind the facade of the Owls Club: The forgotten history of Tucson's turn-of-the-century bachelor residence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291848
Title:
Behind the facade of the Owls Club: The forgotten history of Tucson's turn-of-the-century bachelor residence
Author:
Cary, Brian Lee, 1966-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There are a lot of misconceptions about the Owls Club, located at 378 N. Main Street in Tucson, Arizona. Many of these are the result of the popularity of the bachelors who formed Tucson's first men's club, The Owls, in the late nineteenth century. The restoration/renovation of the building in 1986 facilitated a revival of popular notions that the Owls Club served as a clubhouse for the gregarious society of men. However, by examining the building in its appropriate context of "Tucson Boosterism," different conclusions are drawn. Although the residence is connected with members of The Owls, the buildings construction after the organization's social and group emphasis had ended. Instead, research revealed that the Owls Club was designed as a single-family residence to promote the development of an elite Anglo neighborhood in Tucson while, simultaneously, reinforcing its patrons' position in society.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Sociology, Social Structure and Development.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
M.Arch.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Van Slyck, Abigail A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBehind the facade of the Owls Club: The forgotten history of Tucson's turn-of-the-century bachelor residenceen_US
dc.creatorCary, Brian Lee, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCary, Brian Lee, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are a lot of misconceptions about the Owls Club, located at 378 N. Main Street in Tucson, Arizona. Many of these are the result of the popularity of the bachelors who formed Tucson's first men's club, The Owls, in the late nineteenth century. The restoration/renovation of the building in 1986 facilitated a revival of popular notions that the Owls Club served as a clubhouse for the gregarious society of men. However, by examining the building in its appropriate context of "Tucson Boosterism," different conclusions are drawn. Although the residence is connected with members of The Owls, the buildings construction after the organization's social and group emphasis had ended. Instead, research revealed that the Owls Club was designed as a single-family residence to promote the development of an elite Anglo neighborhood in Tucson while, simultaneously, reinforcing its patrons' position in society.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVan Slyck, Abigail A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348465en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27570459en_US
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