An exploratory study of theory of mind in aphasia, Alzheimer disease and normal aging

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291846
Title:
An exploratory study of theory of mind in aphasia, Alzheimer disease and normal aging
Author:
Lowe, Christina Rachael
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Theory of mind has seldom been studied in normal elders (NE) or people with aphasia (APH), and has never been studied in people with Alzheimer Disease (AD). This study, based on Miller (2001), investigated false belief attribution in 10 APH, 10 AD, and 10 NE subjects. Three conditions of the false belief task varied syntactically to probe for an interaction between linguistic demand and false belief performance. Relative to normal elders, AD subjects showed impairment in false belief attribution (p < 0.001); APH subjects did not (p = 1.0). There was no effect of linguistic demand for any group. Potential confounding variables (e.g. immediate memory) were nonsignificant. The data suggest a possible nonlinear relationship between false belief attribution and measures of dementia severity and frontal lobe function. The results also suggest methods for comparing theories of theory of mind in future research.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.; Gerontology.; Health Sciences, Speech Pathology.; Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Holland, Audrey L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn exploratory study of theory of mind in aphasia, Alzheimer disease and normal agingen_US
dc.creatorLowe, Christina Rachaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorLowe, Christina Rachaelen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTheory of mind has seldom been studied in normal elders (NE) or people with aphasia (APH), and has never been studied in people with Alzheimer Disease (AD). This study, based on Miller (2001), investigated false belief attribution in 10 APH, 10 AD, and 10 NE subjects. Three conditions of the false belief task varied syntactically to probe for an interaction between linguistic demand and false belief performance. Relative to normal elders, AD subjects showed impairment in false belief attribution (p < 0.001); APH subjects did not (p = 1.0). There was no effect of linguistic demand for any group. Potential confounding variables (e.g. immediate memory) were nonsignificant. The data suggest a possible nonlinear relationship between false belief attribution and measures of dementia severity and frontal lobe function. The results also suggest methods for comparing theories of theory of mind in future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Speech Pathology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolland, Audrey L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1407834en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42565996en_US
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