Marine violence and the politics of meaning during the United States occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291839
Title:
Marine violence and the politics of meaning during the United States occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934
Author:
Forgash, Rebecca, 1970-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States Marine Corps occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934. During that period, Marine brutality became a key issue in the debate between those who supported the Occupation and those who opposed it. By studying the conflicting perspectives on Marine coercion, the author hopes to access the complex field of political and social forces which governed perceptions of the Occupation. Supporters of the Occupation considered Marine coercion to be a "necessary," though unpleasant, accessory to U.S. expansion. Within this discursive framework, the victims of Marine brutality were ignored, and Haitians were reduced to a homogenous "type" of inferior colonized person. In contrast, those who opposed the Occupation emphasized the physical harm done to the victims of Marine violence and asserted the uniqueness of Haitian culture. Using this strategy, dissenters effectively countered the dehumanizing power of the discourse of U.S. expansion by undermining the logic of "necessary" Marine coercion.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; History, Latin American.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nugent, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMarine violence and the politics of meaning during the United States occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934en_US
dc.creatorForgash, Rebecca, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorForgash, Rebecca, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States Marine Corps occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934. During that period, Marine brutality became a key issue in the debate between those who supported the Occupation and those who opposed it. By studying the conflicting perspectives on Marine coercion, the author hopes to access the complex field of political and social forces which governed perceptions of the Occupation. Supporters of the Occupation considered Marine coercion to be a "necessary," though unpleasant, accessory to U.S. expansion. Within this discursive framework, the victims of Marine brutality were ignored, and Haitians were reduced to a homogenous "type" of inferior colonized person. In contrast, those who opposed the Occupation emphasized the physical harm done to the victims of Marine violence and asserted the uniqueness of Haitian culture. Using this strategy, dissenters effectively countered the dehumanizing power of the discourse of U.S. expansion by undermining the logic of "necessary" Marine coercion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNugent, Danielen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1378289en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b338107589en_US
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