Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291835
Title:
Housing from a cultural perspective: The Hopi way of dwelling
Author:
Ahmed, Rameen, 1964-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The traditional Hopi house is a manifestation of the society's place within a larger landscape. The plaza and the Kiva represent the spiritual communal spaces whereas the house is a more pragmatic domain for daily household activities. However, within the house itself there seem to be realms of both the spiritual and the pragmatic. Prior to the late 1800s, Hopi houses were two, three or four stories high. Generally the ground floors and subterranean levels were for the storage of grain and religious artifacts. The upper stories contained habitation rooms and roof terraces used for the more pragmatic chores of the household. Towards the turn of the century, due to numerous influences, the most prevalent living space became the one story house. Analysis of the interviews and observations of existing traditional houses and modern HUD houses shows that Hopi dwellings are still divided into two domains, the pragmatic daily chores in the main habitation room and the storage and/or bedrooms. This fact shows a continued, distinct Hopi use of space. Guidelines are proposed to incorporate these patterns for future housing. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
M.Arch.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Doxtater, Dennis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHousing from a cultural perspective: The Hopi way of dwellingen_US
dc.creatorAhmed, Rameen, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Rameen, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe traditional Hopi house is a manifestation of the society's place within a larger landscape. The plaza and the Kiva represent the spiritual communal spaces whereas the house is a more pragmatic domain for daily household activities. However, within the house itself there seem to be realms of both the spiritual and the pragmatic. Prior to the late 1800s, Hopi houses were two, three or four stories high. Generally the ground floors and subterranean levels were for the storage of grain and religious artifacts. The upper stories contained habitation rooms and roof terraces used for the more pragmatic chores of the household. Towards the turn of the century, due to numerous influences, the most prevalent living space became the one story house. Analysis of the interviews and observations of existing traditional houses and modern HUD houses shows that Hopi dwellings are still divided into two domains, the pragmatic daily chores in the main habitation room and the storage and/or bedrooms. This fact shows a continued, distinct Hopi use of space. Guidelines are proposed to incorporate these patterns for future housing. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoxtater, Dennisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1353105en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27589225en_US
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