Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291834
Title:
Resuscitative decision making: Ethnographic perspectives
Author:
Ventres, William Brainerd, 1958-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The topic of resuscitative decision making for hospitalized patients has generated numerous discussions among clinicians and ethicists. Traditionally, their attention has focused on normative standards, describing how decisions should be made, rather than on how they are made in practice. This study uses qualitative techniques, including key informant and participant interviews, participant observation, and microanalysis of in-hospital discussions, to assess what influence the doctor-patient relationship and other sociocultural and contextual determinants have on actual decision making and communication regarding resuscitation. The results suggest that many factors influence these processes. These include issues of competency and ambiguity, prototypical images of life and death, and the use of a structured form for documentation purposes. In light of these findings, the discussion suggests ways in which physicians can improve resuscitative communication with patients and families.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Health Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mark

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResuscitative decision making: Ethnographic perspectivesen_US
dc.creatorVentres, William Brainerd, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorVentres, William Brainerd, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe topic of resuscitative decision making for hospitalized patients has generated numerous discussions among clinicians and ethicists. Traditionally, their attention has focused on normative standards, describing how decisions should be made, rather than on how they are made in practice. This study uses qualitative techniques, including key informant and participant interviews, participant observation, and microanalysis of in-hospital discussions, to assess what influence the doctor-patient relationship and other sociocultural and contextual determinants have on actual decision making and communication regarding resuscitation. The results suggest that many factors influence these processes. These include issues of competency and ambiguity, prototypical images of life and death, and the use of a structured form for documentation purposes. In light of these findings, the discussion suggests ways in which physicians can improve resuscitative communication with patients and families.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343834en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26882656en_US
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