Stress in newly hired, novice faculty: Causes, coping strategies, and interventions for faculty and institutions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291816
Title:
Stress in newly hired, novice faculty: Causes, coping strategies, and interventions for faculty and institutions
Author:
Pugh, Karen Lavinia, 1965-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The research questions for this study focus on the stress level reported by new faculty, the causes of stress, and the coping strategies used to deal with stress. Data from the New Faculty Project of the National Center for Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, were analyzed to understand the experiences of newly hired faculty at Research-I, Comprehensive-I, Liberal Arts-I, and Two-Year Institutions. Newly hired non-tenured, and below associate professor rank faculty were selected from the initial sample of 177 newly hired faculty; 136 faculty completed surveys, and 95 faculty completed interviews for each of the first three years of their employment. A moderate level of stress was reported and remained relatively stable over time. The causes of faculty stress were of three types: those innate to the position, those due to being new, and those due to life stressors. Three types of coping strategies were employed: those providing a solution, those allowing faculty to maintain, and those in which faculty "gave up".
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Industrial.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dinham, Sarah M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStress in newly hired, novice faculty: Causes, coping strategies, and interventions for faculty and institutionsen_US
dc.creatorPugh, Karen Lavinia, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPugh, Karen Lavinia, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research questions for this study focus on the stress level reported by new faculty, the causes of stress, and the coping strategies used to deal with stress. Data from the New Faculty Project of the National Center for Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, were analyzed to understand the experiences of newly hired faculty at Research-I, Comprehensive-I, Liberal Arts-I, and Two-Year Institutions. Newly hired non-tenured, and below associate professor rank faculty were selected from the initial sample of 177 newly hired faculty; 136 faculty completed surveys, and 95 faculty completed interviews for each of the first three years of their employment. A moderate level of stress was reported and remained relatively stable over time. The causes of faculty stress were of three types: those innate to the position, those due to being new, and those due to life stressors. Three types of coping strategies were employed: those providing a solution, those allowing faculty to maintain, and those in which faculty "gave up".en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDinham, Sarah M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381773en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34109523en_US
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