Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291813
Title:
Nurse case management and hospital length of stay
Author:
Chapman, Evelyn A., 1929-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between hospital length of stay (LOS) and Nurse Case Management (NCM), defined as the coordination of care along a continuum of hospital and community, was investigated. Three groups of discharged patients in the Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) of the Respiratory and Circulatory Medical Diagnostic Categories (MDCs) were described and compared: those who had NCM pre-hospitalization (n = 43), those who had NCM initiated during hospitalization or shortly afterward (n = 22), and those who had no NCM (n = 50). The NCM pre-hospitalization group was older and more likely to live alone. The non-NCM group had more admissions to Critical care. The NCM pre-hospitalization group entered the hospital with lower acuities. The NCM initiated during hospitalization group had significantly higher LOS than the other two groups. There was no significant relationship between LOS and the number and duration of NCM visits. The findings suggest that (1) NCM subjects were at higher risk due to age and living situation and (2) NCM may be associated with reduced LOS on subsequent admissions.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Verran, Joyce A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNurse case management and hospital length of stayen_US
dc.creatorChapman, Evelyn A., 1929-en_US
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Evelyn A., 1929-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between hospital length of stay (LOS) and Nurse Case Management (NCM), defined as the coordination of care along a continuum of hospital and community, was investigated. Three groups of discharged patients in the Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) of the Respiratory and Circulatory Medical Diagnostic Categories (MDCs) were described and compared: those who had NCM pre-hospitalization (n = 43), those who had NCM initiated during hospitalization or shortly afterward (n = 22), and those who had no NCM (n = 50). The NCM pre-hospitalization group was older and more likely to live alone. The non-NCM group had more admissions to Critical care. The NCM pre-hospitalization group entered the hospital with lower acuities. The NCM initiated during hospitalization group had significantly higher LOS than the other two groups. There was no significant relationship between LOS and the number and duration of NCM visits. The findings suggest that (1) NCM subjects were at higher risk due to age and living situation and (2) NCM may be associated with reduced LOS on subsequent admissions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVerran, Joyce A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341266en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26341414en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.