Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291812
Title:
United States-Mexican border zone
Author:
Blackburn, John D. (John Daniel)
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The regulation of people and products moving between the United States and Mexico, most visible along their 2,000 mile-long boundary, also depends on the complementary function of a series of border zones. Located adjacent to the boundary, they form part of each country's administrative attempts to balance national interests and the particular needs of the border area. The boundary, limit of national sovereignty, allows a certain degree of interaction; border zones, while broadening the area of contact, impose some limitations upon it. The form and function of border zones have varied over time, just as administration of the boundary has adjusted to change. Since residents of Northern new Spain met participants of American westward expansion, the two central governments have used border zones to impose restrictions on the interchange. Mexico has feared its northern neighbor's territorial ambitions and economic power. Immigration and drugs from Mexico concern the United States.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Geography.; Political Science, Public Administration.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pederson, Leland R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUnited States-Mexican border zoneen_US
dc.creatorBlackburn, John D. (John Daniel)en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, John D. (John Daniel)en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe regulation of people and products moving between the United States and Mexico, most visible along their 2,000 mile-long boundary, also depends on the complementary function of a series of border zones. Located adjacent to the boundary, they form part of each country's administrative attempts to balance national interests and the particular needs of the border area. The boundary, limit of national sovereignty, allows a certain degree of interaction; border zones, while broadening the area of contact, impose some limitations upon it. The form and function of border zones have varied over time, just as administration of the boundary has adjusted to change. Since residents of Northern new Spain met participants of American westward expansion, the two central governments have used border zones to impose restrictions on the interchange. Mexico has feared its northern neighbor's territorial ambitions and economic power. Immigration and drugs from Mexico concern the United States.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, Public Administration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPederson, Leland R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356819en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b314798819en_US
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