La mancha del platano: The effect of language policyon Puerto Rican national identity in the 1940s

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291753
Title:
La mancha del platano: The effect of language policyon Puerto Rican national identity in the 1940s
Author:
DuBord, Elise Marie
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present work seeks to identity possible sources of the persistent link between the Spanish language and national identity in Puerto Rico. By examining mass media discourse in the 1940s as a turbulent period of language policy conflict between the Island and the U.S. federal government, I suggest that the federal imposition of language policy without the consent or approval of local politicians or educators was influential in the construction of national identity that included language as a major defining factor. Local elites reacted to the colonial hegemony by defining Puerto Rican identity in opposition to American identity. The construction of identity in 1940s is characterized by a cultural conception of nation that redefined national symbols (such as language) in social rather than political terms in order to avoid disturbing the existing colonial hegemony.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Modern.; History, Latin American.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Martinez, Glenn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLa mancha del platano: The effect of language policyon Puerto Rican national identity in the 1940sen_US
dc.creatorDuBord, Elise Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuBord, Elise Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present work seeks to identity possible sources of the persistent link between the Spanish language and national identity in Puerto Rico. By examining mass media discourse in the 1940s as a turbulent period of language policy conflict between the Island and the U.S. federal government, I suggest that the federal imposition of language policy without the consent or approval of local politicians or educators was influential in the construction of national identity that included language as a major defining factor. Local elites reacted to the colonial hegemony by defining Puerto Rican identity in opposition to American identity. The construction of identity in 1940s is characterized by a cultural conception of nation that redefined national symbols (such as language) in social rather than political terms in order to avoid disturbing the existing colonial hegemony.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMartinez, Glennen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1420280en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46711259en_US
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