Breathing patterns associated with hyperventilation: Thoracic vs. abdominal

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291752
Title:
Breathing patterns associated with hyperventilation: Thoracic vs. abdominal
Author:
Shapiro, Cheri Joan, 1964-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that individuals with the Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) are predominantly thoracic breathers. An analogue population was used to examine the breathing patterns of likely (N = 16) as opposed to unlikely (N = 16) hyperventilators. The relative thoracic as opposed to abdominal contribution to total respiratory volume was assessed during periods of quiet breathing and mild stress. Differences in thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume were not found between the likely and unlikely hyperventilators, nor between the quiet and mild stress conditions. A significant effect for sex existed, with females demonstrating a greater thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume than males. A significant group by sex interaction occurred, with likely male hyperventilators displaying a significantly lower thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume than both likely and unlikely females. Results are discussed in terms of application to the HVS, and future avenues of research are suggested.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hyperventilation -- Psychosomatic aspects.; Respiration -- Measurement.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBreathing patterns associated with hyperventilation: Thoracic vs. abdominalen_US
dc.creatorShapiro, Cheri Joan, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Cheri Joan, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that individuals with the Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) are predominantly thoracic breathers. An analogue population was used to examine the breathing patterns of likely (N = 16) as opposed to unlikely (N = 16) hyperventilators. The relative thoracic as opposed to abdominal contribution to total respiratory volume was assessed during periods of quiet breathing and mild stress. Differences in thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume were not found between the likely and unlikely hyperventilators, nor between the quiet and mild stress conditions. A significant effect for sex existed, with females demonstrating a greater thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume than males. A significant group by sex interaction occurred, with likely male hyperventilators displaying a significantly lower thoracic contribution to total respiratory volume than both likely and unlikely females. Results are discussed in terms of application to the HVS, and future avenues of research are suggested.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHyperventilation -- Psychosomatic aspects.en_US
dc.subjectRespiration -- Measurement.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333426en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20116185en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16927606en_US
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