Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291749
Title:
Shown alone: Solo performance as a rehearsal for democracy
Author:
Abrams, Lesley
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The popularity of politically engaged and autobiographical theatrical solo performance grew at the end of the twentieth century in the United States. Why? Using performance texts, videos, live performance and interviews, as well as sociological texts, categories of solo performance were created, revealing commonalities among performers. As expected, it was discovered that there is no single reason for the surge in the art form. The rise of technology, the empowerment movements of the sixties and seventies, an increased emphasis on self-actualization, a decrease in communal activities and postmodernism in art were significant contributors. Economic pressures contribute to why artists choose to go alone, but solo performance is also a means of political discourse and dissent. The relationship between audience and performer mirrors the ritual of witnessing, allowing audiences to empathize with the socio-political experiences of others. Solo performance becomes a form of democratic participation when seen from this perspective.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Theater.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Theatre Arts
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sebesta, Judith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleShown alone: Solo performance as a rehearsal for democracyen_US
dc.creatorAbrams, Lesleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbrams, Lesleyen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe popularity of politically engaged and autobiographical theatrical solo performance grew at the end of the twentieth century in the United States. Why? Using performance texts, videos, live performance and interviews, as well as sociological texts, categories of solo performance were created, revealing commonalities among performers. As expected, it was discovered that there is no single reason for the surge in the art form. The rise of technology, the empowerment movements of the sixties and seventies, an increased emphasis on self-actualization, a decrease in communal activities and postmodernism in art were significant contributors. Economic pressures contribute to why artists choose to go alone, but solo performance is also a means of political discourse and dissent. The relationship between audience and performer mirrors the ritual of witnessing, allowing audiences to empathize with the socio-political experiences of others. Solo performance becomes a form of democratic participation when seen from this perspective.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSebesta, Judithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1414223en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44417615en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.