Induction of ovotoxicity by 4-vinylcyclohexene and butadiene diepoxide in B6C3F₁ mice and F344 rats

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291744
Title:
Induction of ovotoxicity by 4-vinylcyclohexene and butadiene diepoxide in B6C3F₁ mice and F344 rats
Author:
Pierce, Debra Ann
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The occupational chemicals 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH) and butadiene diepoxide (BDE) have shown an ovarian effect in small pre-antral follicles in mice and rats (Flaws et al., 1994b; Doerr et al. , 1995). VCH exists as two enantiomers, S-VCH and R-VCH. Daily dosing with the enantiomers affected small primary follicles and wet tissue weights in B6C3F₁ mice. The S-enantiomer decreased small primary follicle numbers (P < 0.05) and both enantiomers reduced the weights of the ovary and uterus (p < 0.05). The results suggest the S-VCH enantiomer may have a greater ovotoxic effect as compared to the R-VCH enantiomer. In F344 rats, daily dosing with BDE reduced overall body weight (p < 0.05). There was no affect on ovarian follicle numbers. However, other ovarian effects were seen: decreased ovarian weights, delayed vaginal opening, decreased CL numbers and decreased caspase-3 activity in large antral follicles. Overall, BDE had a general toxic effect with a more specific effect in the ovary.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Toxicology.; Biology, Animal Physiology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physiological Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hoyer, Patricia B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInduction of ovotoxicity by 4-vinylcyclohexene and butadiene diepoxide in B6C3F₁ mice and F344 ratsen_US
dc.creatorPierce, Debra Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Debra Annen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe occupational chemicals 4-vinylcyclohexene (VCH) and butadiene diepoxide (BDE) have shown an ovarian effect in small pre-antral follicles in mice and rats (Flaws et al., 1994b; Doerr et al. , 1995). VCH exists as two enantiomers, S-VCH and R-VCH. Daily dosing with the enantiomers affected small primary follicles and wet tissue weights in B6C3F₁ mice. The S-enantiomer decreased small primary follicle numbers (P < 0.05) and both enantiomers reduced the weights of the ovary and uterus (p < 0.05). The results suggest the S-VCH enantiomer may have a greater ovotoxic effect as compared to the R-VCH enantiomer. In F344 rats, daily dosing with BDE reduced overall body weight (p < 0.05). There was no affect on ovarian follicle numbers. However, other ovarian effects were seen: decreased ovarian weights, delayed vaginal opening, decreased CL numbers and decreased caspase-3 activity in large antral follicles. Overall, BDE had a general toxic effect with a more specific effect in the ovary.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Toxicology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHoyer, Patricia B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1407832en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42565704en_US
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