Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291736
Title:
Experimental effectiveness of rock fracture grouting
Author:
Sharpe, Colin James, 1962-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this investigation is to experimentally determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing in welded tuff using ordinary portland cement and microfine cement grouts. Fracture grouting will most likely be used to seal fractures intersecting high level nuclear waste repositories. Fractures are potential pathways for the migration of radionuclides. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders. (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural and, (3) sawcut surfaces serve as fractures. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and that of the fractures themselves are measured under a range of normal stresses. Grouts are injected through axial boreholes at pressures of 0.3 to 4.1 MPa while holding fractures under a constant normal stress. Five grout formulations have been selected. Minor amounts of bentonite (0 to 5 percent by weight) have been added to these grouts to increase stability. Water to cement ratios range from 0.45 to 1.0. Permeameter testing of grouted fractures is used to evaluate the effectiveness of fracture grouting.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Mining.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mining and Geological Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daemen, Jaak J. K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExperimental effectiveness of rock fracture groutingen_US
dc.creatorSharpe, Colin James, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSharpe, Colin James, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this investigation is to experimentally determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing in welded tuff using ordinary portland cement and microfine cement grouts. Fracture grouting will most likely be used to seal fractures intersecting high level nuclear waste repositories. Fractures are potential pathways for the migration of radionuclides. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders. (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural and, (3) sawcut surfaces serve as fractures. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and that of the fractures themselves are measured under a range of normal stresses. Grouts are injected through axial boreholes at pressures of 0.3 to 4.1 MPa while holding fractures under a constant normal stress. Five grout formulations have been selected. Minor amounts of bentonite (0 to 5 percent by weight) have been added to these grouts to increase stability. Water to cement ratios range from 0.45 to 1.0. Permeameter testing of grouted fractures is used to evaluate the effectiveness of fracture grouting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mining.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaemen, Jaak J. K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341497en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26354780en_US
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