An assessment of the mental health of mental health care workers in the public sector

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291732
Title:
An assessment of the mental health of mental health care workers in the public sector
Author:
Storms, Starr, 1948-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The mental and emotional well-being of mental health care professionals can be jeopardized by burnout, a syndrome similar to depression and other affective disorders in its symptomology and effects. A questionnaire designed to assess mental health and burnout was developed using various assessment tools from the mental health care community to obtain information about health habits, stressors, coping skills, personal history, and length of service. Forty-seven workers at a public mental health facility responded to the questionnaire. The results of this study suggest that approximately 20% of mental health care-givers are experiencing high degrees of burnout and mental disease. Neither personal history or long-term service appears to contribute to the burnout. Workers new to the field seem to be at greatest jeopardy. Control coping mechanisms were found to be more effective than escape coping mechanisms in combating stress and mental illness.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn assessment of the mental health of mental health care workers in the public sectoren_US
dc.creatorStorms, Starr, 1948-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStorms, Starr, 1948-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe mental and emotional well-being of mental health care professionals can be jeopardized by burnout, a syndrome similar to depression and other affective disorders in its symptomology and effects. A questionnaire designed to assess mental health and burnout was developed using various assessment tools from the mental health care community to obtain information about health habits, stressors, coping skills, personal history, and length of service. Forty-seven workers at a public mental health facility responded to the questionnaire. The results of this study suggest that approximately 20% of mental health care-givers are experiencing high degrees of burnout and mental disease. Neither personal history or long-term service appears to contribute to the burnout. Workers new to the field seem to be at greatest jeopardy. Control coping mechanisms were found to be more effective than escape coping mechanisms in combating stress and mental illness.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1356818en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b314738299en_US
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