Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291726
Title:
Exercise on stress effects
Author:
Behrens, Scott Edward, 1968-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The major purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise could help alleviate stress when performed on a regular basis. The subjects of the study were 30 University of Arizona students between the ages of 18 and 35. The study was conducted in a Pre-Post Control Group design. Regular exercise consisted of an individual routine worked out with a trainer. The exercise program was designed to raise the heart rate 50-70% of capacity for a duration of 20 consecutive minutes a minimum of three times a week for three weeks. The data consisted of four measures, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, a self-rating of stress, a stress inventory, and blood pressure. The results of this study showed that, while subjects perceived a reduction of stress, there were no significant changes in levels of stress as measured by the pre-post instruments. While previous studies have shown exercise to have important health benefits, the conclusion of the present study suggested that, although the experimental group showed a significant change in perception of stress, the other instruments revealed no significant change.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bergan, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExercise on stress effectsen_US
dc.creatorBehrens, Scott Edward, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBehrens, Scott Edward, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe major purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise could help alleviate stress when performed on a regular basis. The subjects of the study were 30 University of Arizona students between the ages of 18 and 35. The study was conducted in a Pre-Post Control Group design. Regular exercise consisted of an individual routine worked out with a trainer. The exercise program was designed to raise the heart rate 50-70% of capacity for a duration of 20 consecutive minutes a minimum of three times a week for three weeks. The data consisted of four measures, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, a self-rating of stress, a stress inventory, and blood pressure. The results of this study showed that, while subjects perceived a reduction of stress, there were no significant changes in levels of stress as measured by the pre-post instruments. While previous studies have shown exercise to have important health benefits, the conclusion of the present study suggested that, although the experimental group showed a significant change in perception of stress, the other instruments revealed no significant change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBergan, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1350388en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27711031en_US
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