The effects of explicit and interactive encoding of mood and stimuli on mood-dependent memory

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291696
Title:
The effects of explicit and interactive encoding of mood and stimuli on mood-dependent memory
Author:
Tobias, Betsy Ann, 1957-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of explicitly attending to mood during encoding (rating mood) and interactive encoding of mood and stimuli (writing sentences relating the stimuli to encoding mood) on mood-dependent memory for neutral stimuli were examined. It was proposed that these manipulations would both increase the probability that mood state was encoded and increase the strength of the mood-stimuli link in memory thereby enhancing mood-dependent memory. A two list interference paradigm was used where subjects studied two lists of words in two different moods (happy and sad). Recall for both lists was tested while subjects were in one of the two moods. Mood was manipulated by a musical mood induction procedure. Control groups rated pictures for attractiveness and wrote sentences relating the stimuli to a non-moodrelated construct. Mood-dependent memory was not found in any of the conditions. Methodological and theoretical explanations for failure to find mood-dependency along with proposals for future research were discussed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, General.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kihlstrom, John F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of explicit and interactive encoding of mood and stimuli on mood-dependent memoryen_US
dc.creatorTobias, Betsy Ann, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTobias, Betsy Ann, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of explicitly attending to mood during encoding (rating mood) and interactive encoding of mood and stimuli (writing sentences relating the stimuli to encoding mood) on mood-dependent memory for neutral stimuli were examined. It was proposed that these manipulations would both increase the probability that mood state was encoded and increase the strength of the mood-stimuli link in memory thereby enhancing mood-dependent memory. A two list interference paradigm was used where subjects studied two lists of words in two different moods (happy and sad). Recall for both lists was tested while subjects were in one of the two moods. Mood was manipulated by a musical mood induction procedure. Control groups rated pictures for attractiveness and wrote sentences relating the stimuli to a non-moodrelated construct. Mood-dependent memory was not found in any of the conditions. Methodological and theoretical explanations for failure to find mood-dependency along with proposals for future research were discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, General.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKihlstrom, John F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1340716en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2628182xen_US
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