The effect of the menstrual cycle on energy intake and dieting habits of adolescents

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291695
Title:
The effect of the menstrual cycle on energy intake and dieting habits of adolescents
Author:
Cole, Suzanne Marilyn, 1962-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effect of the menstrual cycle on energy intake and the dieting habits of adolescents was examined retrospectively for three years in 64 eighth and ninth grade girls. Dieting episodes were found to be evenly distributed across the five menstrual phases with no greater proportion of dieting occurring during the follicular phase. Media, peers, family members, and social pressures have a larger impact on adolescent dieting behaviors as opposed to the menstrual cycle. Comparisons of energy intake between the pre- and postovulatory phases revealed no significant differences in any year. Fifty to eighty percent of the girls' cycles may have been anovulatory the first two years of the study. Variations in energy intake are not observed in anovulatory cycles due to low ovarian hormone levels. Changes in food consumption that correspond to menstrual phases may be observed in girls who are six years or more beyond menarche, when cycles are predominantly ovulatory.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Psychology, Developmental.; Health Sciences, Human Development.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ritenbaugh, Cheryl K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of the menstrual cycle on energy intake and dieting habits of adolescentsen_US
dc.creatorCole, Suzanne Marilyn, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, Suzanne Marilyn, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effect of the menstrual cycle on energy intake and the dieting habits of adolescents was examined retrospectively for three years in 64 eighth and ninth grade girls. Dieting episodes were found to be evenly distributed across the five menstrual phases with no greater proportion of dieting occurring during the follicular phase. Media, peers, family members, and social pressures have a larger impact on adolescent dieting behaviors as opposed to the menstrual cycle. Comparisons of energy intake between the pre- and postovulatory phases revealed no significant differences in any year. Fifty to eighty percent of the girls' cycles may have been anovulatory the first two years of the study. Variations in energy intake are not observed in anovulatory cycles due to low ovarian hormone levels. Changes in food consumption that correspond to menstrual phases may be observed in girls who are six years or more beyond menarche, when cycles are predominantly ovulatory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Human Development.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRitenbaugh, Cheryl K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1376004en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b335211899en_US
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