Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291687
Title:
Residential architecture on Albion Island, Belize
Author:
Cook, Patricia Maria, 1965-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The discovery of small, residential-sized mounds in the northern Yucatan composed of solid or nearly solid rubble limestone triggered a vigorous debate within Maya archaeology over the actual function of these mounds. Many Mayanists found it difficult to accept that these were indeed housemounds based on their size and composition. A review of recent excavations of similar mounds from various regions within the Maya area is combined with new evidence from Albion Island, Belize, to posit that rubble construction is merely an alternate form of construction dictated by geologic and geographical constraints. Group 200 on Albion Island is a group of five mounds which in size, shape, and cultural artifacts fall within the designation 'housemound,' but which are composed mainly of limestone cobbles and boulders.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Culbert, T. Patrick

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResidential architecture on Albion Island, Belizeen_US
dc.creatorCook, Patricia Maria, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCook, Patricia Maria, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe discovery of small, residential-sized mounds in the northern Yucatan composed of solid or nearly solid rubble limestone triggered a vigorous debate within Maya archaeology over the actual function of these mounds. Many Mayanists found it difficult to accept that these were indeed housemounds based on their size and composition. A review of recent excavations of similar mounds from various regions within the Maya area is combined with new evidence from Albion Island, Belize, to posit that rubble construction is merely an alternate form of construction dictated by geologic and geographical constraints. Group 200 on Albion Island is a group of five mounds which in size, shape, and cultural artifacts fall within the designation 'housemound,' but which are composed mainly of limestone cobbles and boulders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCulbert, T. Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1344015en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26917269en_US
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