Indians and criminal justice administration: The failure of the criminal justice system for the American Indian

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291683
Title:
Indians and criminal justice administration: The failure of the criminal justice system for the American Indian
Author:
Guilfoyle, Michael Hoag, 1946-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The criminal justice administration has failed the American Indian. Since the usurpation of traditional tribal criminal justice management by the local, state, and federal criminal justice systems, the impacts of Indian crime have become epidemic. The American Indian has the highest arrest rates, alcohol-related crime, violent-related crime, and conviction rates of any group in the United States. Indians are 15% less likely to receive deferred sentences, and 15% less likely to receive parole. In addition, the Indian offender has the highest recidivism rate of any ethnic group in the United State. This paper discusses the problems of Indians in the criminal justice system at the adult and juvenile level. As recommendations it stresses the empowering of the Indian community, the greater autonomy of tribal courts, the concepts of alternative sentencing programs for Indian offenders, treatment as justice, and the idea that Indian people can take charge of this problem and do a better job in addressing their relatives.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Indians of North America; Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indians Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Deloria, Vine, Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIndians and criminal justice administration: The failure of the criminal justice system for the American Indianen_US
dc.creatorGuilfoyle, Michael Hoag, 1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuilfoyle, Michael Hoag, 1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe criminal justice administration has failed the American Indian. Since the usurpation of traditional tribal criminal justice management by the local, state, and federal criminal justice systems, the impacts of Indian crime have become epidemic. The American Indian has the highest arrest rates, alcohol-related crime, violent-related crime, and conviction rates of any group in the United States. Indians are 15% less likely to receive deferred sentences, and 15% less likely to receive parole. In addition, the Indian offender has the highest recidivism rate of any ethnic group in the United State. This paper discusses the problems of Indians in the criminal justice system at the adult and juvenile level. As recommendations it stresses the empowering of the Indian community, the greater autonomy of tribal courts, the concepts of alternative sentencing programs for Indian offenders, treatment as justice, and the idea that Indian people can take charge of this problem and do a better job in addressing their relatives.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North Americaen_US
dc.subjectCriminal justice, Administration of -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indians Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDeloria, Vine, Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335686en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21315534en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17213095en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.