Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291678
Title:
Community mediation and gender ideology
Author:
London, Scott Barry, 1962-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The community mediation movement has arisen in response to criticisms of the American judicial system. Advocates claim it can counter the role of law in reproducing ideologies that disadvantage subordinate groups, such as women. But this potential relies in part on the ideological positions of the mediators themselves. This study evaluates the counter-hegemonic potential of community mediation in regard to a gendered social power structure through an ideological analysis of sixteen male volunteer community mediators in Tucson, Arizona. Arguing against a narrow economic or gender reductionist analytical approach, this study relies on a neo-Gramscian perspective to uncover the multiple factors that determine this ideology. What emerges is a gender ideology that at once contains a "feminist" critique of social power structures yet is filled with contradictions. This implies that the community mediation movement must continue to struggle if it is to become a genuinely counter-hegemonic movement.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Henderson, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCommunity mediation and gender ideologyen_US
dc.creatorLondon, Scott Barry, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLondon, Scott Barry, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe community mediation movement has arisen in response to criticisms of the American judicial system. Advocates claim it can counter the role of law in reproducing ideologies that disadvantage subordinate groups, such as women. But this potential relies in part on the ideological positions of the mediators themselves. This study evaluates the counter-hegemonic potential of community mediation in regard to a gendered social power structure through an ideological analysis of sixteen male volunteer community mediators in Tucson, Arizona. Arguing against a narrow economic or gender reductionist analytical approach, this study relies on a neo-Gramscian perspective to uncover the multiple factors that determine this ideology. What emerges is a gender ideology that at once contains a "feminist" critique of social power structures yet is filled with contradictions. This implies that the community mediation movement must continue to struggle if it is to become a genuinely counter-hegemonic movement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHenderson, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346738en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27279777en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.