The Brazilian military ideology: Implications for institutionalized democracy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291675
Title:
The Brazilian military ideology: Implications for institutionalized democracy
Author:
Smith, Jeffery Bradley Stewart, 1965-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Brazilian military possesses an institutional ideology separate from that of civil society. This ideology has in the past mistakenly been identified as the National Security Doctrine (NSD). However, the NSD is merely the codification of a flexible and continuous ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century. The ideology is based on geopolitical theory which the military believes offers an objective and scientific approach to the problems of national security. According to the ideology, the organic state's national security is in a constant state of peril which grants the military the role of state guardian. As guardians of the state the military also views itself as society's tutor in the process of preparing the nation for the responsible exercise of democracy. As long as the flexible and authoritarian military ideology is present, democracy in Brazil cannot be institutionalized and will, at best, be a limited democracy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Geography.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Buchanan, Paul G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Brazilian military ideology: Implications for institutionalized democracyen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Jeffery Bradley Stewart, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jeffery Bradley Stewart, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Brazilian military possesses an institutional ideology separate from that of civil society. This ideology has in the past mistakenly been identified as the National Security Doctrine (NSD). However, the NSD is merely the codification of a flexible and continuous ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century. The ideology is based on geopolitical theory which the military believes offers an objective and scientific approach to the problems of national security. According to the ideology, the organic state's national security is in a constant state of peril which grants the military the role of state guardian. As guardians of the state the military also views itself as society's tutor in the process of preparing the nation for the responsible exercise of democracy. As long as the flexible and authoritarian military ideology is present, democracy in Brazil cannot be institutionalized and will, at best, be a limited democracy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBuchanan, Paul G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1357289en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b319141609en_US
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