A geographic perspective on sovereignty and perseverance on the Akwesasne Mohawk Indian Reservation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291665
Title:
A geographic perspective on sovereignty and perseverance on the Akwesasne Mohawk Indian Reservation
Author:
Eden, Eric James, 1965-
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Akwesasne Mohawk Indian Reservation, which straddles the U.S.-Canada border in northern New York State, is analyzed in order to reveal how it has persevered, despite enormous political and economic difficulties, since its founding around 1754. It is demonstrated that a number of facets of Mohawk social life have allowed the community to flourish. Preeminent among these has been the issue of Mohawk sovereignty and the role of Mohawk women in maintaining the community. As the tendency for Mohawk men to work away from the community increased, the tradition of Mohawk women staying on the reservation to raise children and maintain traditional family and community values provided all community members with a geographically explicit area to which they could refer as home. These roles have reinforced and recast ancient Mohawk concepts of sovereignty. Social history and historical censuses provide valuable insights into these issues.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Geography.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Plane, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA geographic perspective on sovereignty and perseverance on the Akwesasne Mohawk Indian Reservationen_US
dc.creatorEden, Eric James, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorEden, Eric James, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Akwesasne Mohawk Indian Reservation, which straddles the U.S.-Canada border in northern New York State, is analyzed in order to reveal how it has persevered, despite enormous political and economic difficulties, since its founding around 1754. It is demonstrated that a number of facets of Mohawk social life have allowed the community to flourish. Preeminent among these has been the issue of Mohawk sovereignty and the role of Mohawk women in maintaining the community. As the tendency for Mohawk men to work away from the community increased, the tradition of Mohawk women staying on the reservation to raise children and maintain traditional family and community values provided all community members with a geographically explicit area to which they could refer as home. These roles have reinforced and recast ancient Mohawk concepts of sovereignty. Social history and historical censuses provide valuable insights into these issues.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPlane, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1355156en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b310893929en_US
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