A German reaction to Native Americans: Karl May's concept of cultural development

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291661
Title:
A German reaction to Native Americans: Karl May's concept of cultural development
Author:
May, Katja, 1961-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The "demise" of Native American cultures and the possibility of their "renascence" is the subject of the literary work analyzed in this thesis. The German popular novelist Karl May (1842-1912) aspired to write the epic drama of the American Indians. Using randomly selected anthropological and linguistic information, he described particularly Apache and Comanche Indian cultures with regard to leadership, warfare, women, and intermarriage. May viewed the Indians' assimilation as necessary and arrogantly recommended the "benign" influence brought by Germans to the New World. The Indians would be able to withstand the lure of "Yankee" materialism and pursue the path of righteousness. As this thesis points out, there is a correlation between Karl May's biography and his compassion for a wronged people such as the Native Americans. This study analyzes Karl May's thoughts on the "Indian question" and his emphasis on the role of change.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Indians in literature.; May, Karl Friedrich, 1842-1912 -- Political and social views.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; German
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Richter, Roland

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA German reaction to Native Americans: Karl May's concept of cultural developmenten_US
dc.creatorMay, Katja, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMay, Katja, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe "demise" of Native American cultures and the possibility of their "renascence" is the subject of the literary work analyzed in this thesis. The German popular novelist Karl May (1842-1912) aspired to write the epic drama of the American Indians. Using randomly selected anthropological and linguistic information, he described particularly Apache and Comanche Indian cultures with regard to leadership, warfare, women, and intermarriage. May viewed the Indians' assimilation as necessary and arrogantly recommended the "benign" influence brought by Germans to the New World. The Indians would be able to withstand the lure of "Yankee" materialism and pursue the path of righteousness. As this thesis points out, there is a correlation between Karl May's biography and his compassion for a wronged people such as the Native Americans. This study analyzes Karl May's thoughts on the "Indian question" and his emphasis on the role of change.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndians in literature.en_US
dc.subjectMay, Karl Friedrich, 1842-1912 -- Political and social views.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGermanen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRichter, Rolanden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1338079en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22515259en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17450044en_US
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