Transpiration in cottonwood and willow riparian forests at perennial and ephemeral stream sites

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291631
Title:
Transpiration in cottonwood and willow riparian forests at perennial and ephemeral stream sites
Author:
Schaeffer, Sean Michael, 1971-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sap flow, leaf gas exchange, and micrometeorological parameters were evaluated during 1997 in riparian forest at perennial and ephemeral stream sites on the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, USA. At the perennial stream site, measurements of sapwood area based transpiration and sapwood area/canopy area of clusters of Populus fremontii and Salix goodingii were used to estimate transpiration across the stand. Stand structural heterogeneity resulted in as much as 30% variation in mean transpiration across the stand. Transpiration of cottonwood was more dependent upon vapor pressure deficit at the ephemeral stream site which had an open, less dense canopy compared to that at the perennial stream site. This may be due to differences in advection properties and canopy feedback processes between sites. Conversely, transpiration in willow was less dependent upon vapor pressure at the ephemeral stream site than that at the perennial stream site. This may be due to water stress associated with deeper depth to groundwater.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Agriculture, Range Management.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, David G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTranspiration in cottonwood and willow riparian forests at perennial and ephemeral stream sitesen_US
dc.creatorSchaeffer, Sean Michael, 1971-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchaeffer, Sean Michael, 1971-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSap flow, leaf gas exchange, and micrometeorological parameters were evaluated during 1997 in riparian forest at perennial and ephemeral stream sites on the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, USA. At the perennial stream site, measurements of sapwood area based transpiration and sapwood area/canopy area of clusters of Populus fremontii and Salix goodingii were used to estimate transpiration across the stand. Stand structural heterogeneity resulted in as much as 30% variation in mean transpiration across the stand. Transpiration of cottonwood was more dependent upon vapor pressure deficit at the ephemeral stream site which had an open, less dense canopy compared to that at the perennial stream site. This may be due to differences in advection properties and canopy feedback processes between sites. Conversely, transpiration in willow was less dependent upon vapor pressure at the ephemeral stream site than that at the perennial stream site. This may be due to water stress associated with deeper depth to groundwater.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Range Management.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, David G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1393714en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39470908en_US
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