Social memory and Germany's immigration crisis: A case of collective forgetting

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291625
Title:
Social memory and Germany's immigration crisis: A case of collective forgetting
Author:
Smith, Andrea Lynn, 1960-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Representations of Germany's crisis of anti-foreigner violence and ambivalent government policies regarding guestworkers misrepresent this crisis and reproduce several myths: that Germany has only recently relied on foreign labor, that Germany is an unusually "homogenous" nation, has experienced little integration of foreigners, and is not and cannot become an "immigration" country. These myths hinge on a widespread "forgetting" of much of German labor history. This paper outlines this missing history. Features common to past and present "guestworker" policies are highlighted. An examination of modern German citizenship and naturalization laws suggests that guestworker crises derive from a fundamental contradiction between economic and political interests. The current crisis can be viewed as one phase of a longer unresolved conflict between economic goals and the definition of the German nation. Such a perspective is generally avoided, however, as earlier periods of conflict are erased through widespread collective forgetting.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; History, European.; History, Modern.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Park, Thomas K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSocial memory and Germany's immigration crisis: A case of collective forgettingen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Andrea Lynn, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Andrea Lynn, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRepresentations of Germany's crisis of anti-foreigner violence and ambivalent government policies regarding guestworkers misrepresent this crisis and reproduce several myths: that Germany has only recently relied on foreign labor, that Germany is an unusually "homogenous" nation, has experienced little integration of foreigners, and is not and cannot become an "immigration" country. These myths hinge on a widespread "forgetting" of much of German labor history. This paper outlines this missing history. Features common to past and present "guestworker" policies are highlighted. An examination of modern German citizenship and naturalization laws suggests that guestworker crises derive from a fundamental contradiction between economic and political interests. The current crisis can be viewed as one phase of a longer unresolved conflict between economic goals and the definition of the German nation. Such a perspective is generally avoided, however, as earlier periods of conflict are erased through widespread collective forgetting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, European.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPark, Thomas K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1348509en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27589894en_US
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