Astronomical orientations and dimensions of Archaic and Classical Greek temples

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291618
Title:
Astronomical orientations and dimensions of Archaic and Classical Greek temples
Author:
Nell, Erin Ann
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previously it has been assumed that the majority of Greek temples were oriented towards the eastern horizon, in the direction of sunrise. The author of this thesis conducted a GPS temple orientation survey of eight Greek Doric temples and concluded that these structures were actually oriented to the western, not eastern, horizon, in the direction of sunset. The following facts support this hypothesis: (1) of the eight temples surveyed, the western orientations of six were more precise than their eastern orientations, (2) in the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece, architecturally aligning structures to the western horizon could have been accomplished with far greater ease and higher precision than to the eastern horizon, (3) literary evidence by Vitruvius supports this claim of western temple alignments, and (4) the lengths of each temple surveyed appear to have been determined via the same technique which oriented them to the sun on the western horizon.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Religion, History of.; Anthropology, Archaeology.; History, Ancient.; History of Science.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Classics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leonard, Albert, Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAstronomical orientations and dimensions of Archaic and Classical Greek templesen_US
dc.creatorNell, Erin Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorNell, Erin Annen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPreviously it has been assumed that the majority of Greek temples were oriented towards the eastern horizon, in the direction of sunrise. The author of this thesis conducted a GPS temple orientation survey of eight Greek Doric temples and concluded that these structures were actually oriented to the western, not eastern, horizon, in the direction of sunset. The following facts support this hypothesis: (1) of the eight temples surveyed, the western orientations of six were more precise than their eastern orientations, (2) in the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece, architecturally aligning structures to the western horizon could have been accomplished with far greater ease and higher precision than to the eastern horizon, (3) literary evidence by Vitruvius supports this claim of western temple alignments, and (4) the lengths of each temple surveyed appear to have been determined via the same technique which oriented them to the sun on the western horizon.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReligion, History of.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Ancient.en_US
dc.subjectHistory of Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineClassicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeonard, Albert, Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1418602en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b45645449en_US
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