Temper, thermal shock and cooking pots: A study of tempering materials and their physical significance in prehistoric and traditional cooking pottery

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291609
Title:
Temper, thermal shock and cooking pots: A study of tempering materials and their physical significance in prehistoric and traditional cooking pottery
Author:
West, Steven Michael, 1962-
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Prehistoric and traditional ceramics contain a wide range of tempers (non-plastic inclusions), including sand, sherd (grog), sponge spicules, phytoliths (siliceous bark ash), diatomite, organic fibers, shell, calcite, mica and asbestos. The use of these materials in traditional and archaeological ceramics and their association with cooking pottery and thermal shock resistance are examined. The thermal shock parameters that are relevant to low-fired ceramics are identified and tested. The primary factor in the thermal shock resistance is identified as fracture toughness. By increasing the amount and size range of temper additions, and by selecting tempers that are platy and fibrous, fracture toughness can be enhanced. Secondary factors include porosity, thermal expansion and relative strength. These parameters are tested employing fracture energy and thermal expansion measurements, and quench tests.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kingery, W. D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTemper, thermal shock and cooking pots: A study of tempering materials and their physical significance in prehistoric and traditional cooking potteryen_US
dc.creatorWest, Steven Michael, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Steven Michael, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrehistoric and traditional ceramics contain a wide range of tempers (non-plastic inclusions), including sand, sherd (grog), sponge spicules, phytoliths (siliceous bark ash), diatomite, organic fibers, shell, calcite, mica and asbestos. The use of these materials in traditional and archaeological ceramics and their association with cooking pottery and thermal shock resistance are examined. The thermal shock parameters that are relevant to low-fired ceramics are identified and tested. The primary factor in the thermal shock resistance is identified as fracture toughness. By increasing the amount and size range of temper additions, and by selecting tempers that are platy and fibrous, fracture toughness can be enhanced. Secondary factors include porosity, thermal expansion and relative strength. These parameters are tested employing fracture energy and thermal expansion measurements, and quench tests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKingery, W. D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1351349en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26868179en_US
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