Soft wheat pasta supplemented with cowpea: Nutritional, sensory and cooking quality studies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291602
Title:
Soft wheat pasta supplemented with cowpea: Nutritional, sensory and cooking quality studies
Author:
Bergman, Christine Joy, 1960-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pasta was produced from soft wheat supplemented with cowpea. Acid detergent fiber values increased from 0.4% in the soft wheat pasta (SWP) to 1.1% in the 30% cowpea pasta (CP). Cowpea supplementation provided an increase in total and available lysine from 42 to 113% and 39 to 117%, respectively. Chemical scores for preschool children increased from 56 in the SWP to 89 in the 30% CP. For school children the 20% CP provided a score of 102. The in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) of cowpea was lower than that of soft wheat; as a result cowpea reduced the IVPD of SWP from 84% to a value of 78% for the 30% CP. The protein content of SWP was 10.9% while the CP ranged from 11.3 to 14.2%. Considering IVPD values, SWP contained 9.2% digestible protein and CP from 9.2 to 11.1%. After cooking, only the 30% CP displayed trypsin inhibitor activity. Upon visual examination, cowpea improved the color of SP making it comparable to the durum semolina control (DSC) but lacking its translucency. A sensory panel reported no difference in acceptability among treatments. Cooked weights were similar to the SWP, except with 30% replacement when a decrease was observed. CP, after 10 minutes of cooking demonstrated reduced loss as supplementation was increased. After 20 minutes all treatments had similar cooking loss compared to the SP. All treatments displayed cooking quality results significantly different from the DSC.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Food Science and Technology.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutrition and Food Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weber, Charles W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSoft wheat pasta supplemented with cowpea: Nutritional, sensory and cooking quality studiesen_US
dc.creatorBergman, Christine Joy, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBergman, Christine Joy, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPasta was produced from soft wheat supplemented with cowpea. Acid detergent fiber values increased from 0.4% in the soft wheat pasta (SWP) to 1.1% in the 30% cowpea pasta (CP). Cowpea supplementation provided an increase in total and available lysine from 42 to 113% and 39 to 117%, respectively. Chemical scores for preschool children increased from 56 in the SWP to 89 in the 30% CP. For school children the 20% CP provided a score of 102. The in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) of cowpea was lower than that of soft wheat; as a result cowpea reduced the IVPD of SWP from 84% to a value of 78% for the 30% CP. The protein content of SWP was 10.9% while the CP ranged from 11.3 to 14.2%. Considering IVPD values, SWP contained 9.2% digestible protein and CP from 9.2 to 11.1%. After cooking, only the 30% CP displayed trypsin inhibitor activity. Upon visual examination, cowpea improved the color of SP making it comparable to the durum semolina control (DSC) but lacking its translucency. A sensory panel reported no difference in acceptability among treatments. Cooked weights were similar to the SWP, except with 30% replacement when a decrease was observed. CP, after 10 minutes of cooking demonstrated reduced loss as supplementation was increased. After 20 minutes all treatments had similar cooking loss compared to the SP. All treatments displayed cooking quality results significantly different from the DSC.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Food Science and Technology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition and Food Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWeber, Charles W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342952en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26621800en_US
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