Collectors of Navajo rugs: An analysis and comparison of the Marjorie Merriweather Post and Washington Matthews Smithsonian Collection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291582
Title:
Collectors of Navajo rugs: An analysis and comparison of the Marjorie Merriweather Post and Washington Matthews Smithsonian Collection
Author:
Tacheenie-Campoy, Glory, 1952-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Navajo blankets and rugs collected by Washington Matthews and Marjorie Merriweather Post are now held by the Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Matthews, medical doctor and anthropologist, actively collected Navajo blankets; to preserve them in museums and gather knowledge about them in publications. His goal was to learn about the Navajos before they merged into dominate American culture. Post, philanthropist, art collector, and socialite, collected Navajo blankets and rugs as status symbols, decorations and souvenirs when they were marketed by traders and weavers. Her collections once exhibited at her estates are now exhibited at the Hillwood Museum and the Museum of Natural History, in Washington, D.C. This thesis is about the collectors, their collections and why they collected Navajo blankets and rugs. Tables and photographs illustrate the collection.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Fine Arts.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zepeda, Ofelia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCollectors of Navajo rugs: An analysis and comparison of the Marjorie Merriweather Post and Washington Matthews Smithsonian Collectionen_US
dc.creatorTacheenie-Campoy, Glory, 1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTacheenie-Campoy, Glory, 1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNavajo blankets and rugs collected by Washington Matthews and Marjorie Merriweather Post are now held by the Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Matthews, medical doctor and anthropologist, actively collected Navajo blankets; to preserve them in museums and gather knowledge about them in publications. His goal was to learn about the Navajos before they merged into dominate American culture. Post, philanthropist, art collector, and socialite, collected Navajo blankets and rugs as status symbols, decorations and souvenirs when they were marketed by traders and weavers. Her collections once exhibited at her estates are now exhibited at the Hillwood Museum and the Museum of Natural History, in Washington, D.C. This thesis is about the collectors, their collections and why they collected Navajo blankets and rugs. Tables and photographs illustrate the collection.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectFine Arts.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZepeda, Ofeliaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1340308en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26253161en_US
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