The media and Hillary Rodham Clinton: Similarities and differences in 1993 coverage

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291573
Title:
The media and Hillary Rodham Clinton: Similarities and differences in 1993 coverage
Author:
DeCamp, Mary Helen, 1957-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Media choose words and pictures to tell stories. Opinion formation is influenced when audiences do not have direct personal involvement, if the source is credible, and where the information conforms to preconceived stereotypes--conditions present when news focuses on First Ladies. This seminal work evaluates similarities and differences in media portrayals of a new type of First Lady. Data from 1993 news are collected from nine mass media sources (three television, three newspapers, and three magazines) to analyze the content of stories, the number of stories, placement of stories, portrayals of Hillary; Clinton's role, whether balanced sources are cited, if bias is evident, what type of framing is used, how many reporters contribute to coverage, presence of visuals, and congruity of elements.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Political Science, General.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kenski, Henry C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe media and Hillary Rodham Clinton: Similarities and differences in 1993 coverageen_US
dc.creatorDeCamp, Mary Helen, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeCamp, Mary Helen, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMedia choose words and pictures to tell stories. Opinion formation is influenced when audiences do not have direct personal involvement, if the source is credible, and where the information conforms to preconceived stereotypes--conditions present when news focuses on First Ladies. This seminal work evaluates similarities and differences in media portrayals of a new type of First Lady. Data from 1993 news are collected from nine mass media sources (three television, three newspapers, and three magazines) to analyze the content of stories, the number of stories, placement of stories, portrayals of Hillary; Clinton's role, whether balanced sources are cited, if bias is evident, what type of framing is used, how many reporters contribute to coverage, presence of visuals, and congruity of elements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKenski, Henry C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358973en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b323990789en_US
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