Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291566
Title:
Desert tortoise conservation genetics
Author:
Edwards, Taylor
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Managing for the long-term survival of a species requires an understanding of its population genetics. The desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, inhabits the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of North America. Desert tortoises face many threats to their continued survival, including habitat loss and fragmentation. I used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers to examine genetic structure within and among populations of desert tortoises. I found that both the Mojave and Sonoran populations of desert tortoise exhibit similar patterns of population genetic structure. Gene flow among localities within each region is part of the evolutionary history of the desert tortoise and dispersal events probably play an important role in the long-term maintenance of populations. Movement barriers caused by anthropogenic landscape changes have the potential to effect desert tortoise population viability. Understanding the historical connectivity between and within the Mojave and Sonoran populations of desert tortoises will help facilitate the conservation of this species.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwalbe, Cecil R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDesert tortoise conservation geneticsen_US
dc.creatorEdwards, Tayloren_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Tayloren_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractManaging for the long-term survival of a species requires an understanding of its population genetics. The desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, inhabits the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of North America. Desert tortoises face many threats to their continued survival, including habitat loss and fragmentation. I used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA markers to examine genetic structure within and among populations of desert tortoises. I found that both the Mojave and Sonoran populations of desert tortoise exhibit similar patterns of population genetic structure. Gene flow among localities within each region is part of the evolutionary history of the desert tortoise and dispersal events probably play an important role in the long-term maintenance of populations. Movement barriers caused by anthropogenic landscape changes have the potential to effect desert tortoise population viability. Understanding the historical connectivity between and within the Mojave and Sonoran populations of desert tortoises will help facilitate the conservation of this species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwalbe, Cecil R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1414228en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44420833en_US
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