Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291549
Title:
An examination of interpersonal influence between peers
Author:
Romesburg, Tyla Sue, 1966-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Interpersonal influence between peers is marked by the need to (1) maintain a positive image, (2) achieve instrumental or task goals, and (3) maintain interpersonal relations with one's partner. This investigation examined the process of balancing these three objectives or needs, and further examined the consequences associated with failure to balance all objectives. Peers were videotaped during an influence interaction, and their verbal strategies were coded by trained coders along a 5-dimensional scale. Verbal evaluations made by coders were correlated with self-report measures of (1) issue importance, (2) stress, (3) communication satisfaction, and (4) relational message interpretations. Correlation results indicate that while unsupported, there is a trend between stress and self-defense strategies, and between issue importance and other-accusation strategies. Results of hypotheses testing the correlation between communication satisfaction and relational message interpretations, and strategy usage were unsupported. Post-hoc analyses are offered.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Business Administration, Management.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newton, Deborah A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn examination of interpersonal influence between peersen_US
dc.creatorRomesburg, Tyla Sue, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRomesburg, Tyla Sue, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterpersonal influence between peers is marked by the need to (1) maintain a positive image, (2) achieve instrumental or task goals, and (3) maintain interpersonal relations with one's partner. This investigation examined the process of balancing these three objectives or needs, and further examined the consequences associated with failure to balance all objectives. Peers were videotaped during an influence interaction, and their verbal strategies were coded by trained coders along a 5-dimensional scale. Verbal evaluations made by coders were correlated with self-report measures of (1) issue importance, (2) stress, (3) communication satisfaction, and (4) relational message interpretations. Correlation results indicate that while unsupported, there is a trend between stress and self-defense strategies, and between issue importance and other-accusation strategies. Results of hypotheses testing the correlation between communication satisfaction and relational message interpretations, and strategy usage were unsupported. Post-hoc analyses are offered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewton, Deborah A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341286en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2634161xen_US
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