A testbed for investigating the effect of electrode structure on the performance of a solid oxide electrolysis system

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291547
Title:
A testbed for investigating the effect of electrode structure on the performance of a solid oxide electrolysis system
Author:
Brod, Stephen P., 1970-
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) can reduce the mass launched to low Earth orbit for a Mars Sample Return Mission by as much as 75%. Solid Oxide Electrolysis is a candidate technology for producing oxygen out of carbon dioxide. A testbed was developed to test the effect of electrode structure on electrode performance. The testbed used all metal interconnects. Electrodes of 0.5 microns (applied by evaporative deposition) and 10-12 microns thick (applied by airbrushing) were produced. The disks were tested in argon, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. The thin electrode showed deterioration in both short term and long term tests. The thick electrode showed no deterioration even over a 120 hour test. Oxygen was produced from carbon dioxide for extended durations. The experiments show the thicker electrode is needed for an oxygen production system. The electrode/electrolyte disks withstood normal handling without damage.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Aerospace.; Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ramohalli, Kumar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA testbed for investigating the effect of electrode structure on the performance of a solid oxide electrolysis systemen_US
dc.creatorBrod, Stephen P., 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrod, Stephen P., 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) can reduce the mass launched to low Earth orbit for a Mars Sample Return Mission by as much as 75%. Solid Oxide Electrolysis is a candidate technology for producing oxygen out of carbon dioxide. A testbed was developed to test the effect of electrode structure on electrode performance. The testbed used all metal interconnects. Electrodes of 0.5 microns (applied by evaporative deposition) and 10-12 microns thick (applied by airbrushing) were produced. The disks were tested in argon, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. The thin electrode showed deterioration in both short term and long term tests. The thick electrode showed no deterioration even over a 120 hour test. Oxygen was produced from carbon dioxide for extended durations. The experiments show the thicker electrode is needed for an oxygen production system. The electrode/electrolyte disks withstood normal handling without damage.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Aerospace.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRamohalli, Kumaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest1381797en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34096723en_US
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