Branching in Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis): Natural variation and effects of plant growth regulators and pruning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291527
Title:
Branching in Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis): Natural variation and effects of plant growth regulators and pruning
Author:
Ravetta, Damian Andres, 1962-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In jojoba, flower buds are typically produced at every other node on new growth near branch tips. An increase in the number of branch tips (branching frequency) could possibly increase flower bud and fruit production. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of three concentrations of Benzyladenine (BA), Gibberellin4+7 (GA), and Promalin (a mixture of BA and GA) on branching and flower production of three jojoba clones. Treatments involving pinching and untreated control plants were also included. The growth regulators had a significant effect on both branching and flower bud production, and clones differed in their response. For the most responsive clone, the most effective treatments (100 ppm GA and 100 ppm Promalin) resulted in 133% and 110% increase in flower buds after 17 months, respectively. The increase in flower buds was associated with an increase in the number of growing tips and node production. Similar responses were observed in both greenhouse and field experiments. The results of these studies indicate that growth regulators can be used to significantly increase flower bud production on jojoba.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Agronomy.; Agriculture, Plant Culture.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Plant Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Palzkill, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBranching in Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis): Natural variation and effects of plant growth regulators and pruningen_US
dc.creatorRavetta, Damian Andres, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRavetta, Damian Andres, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn jojoba, flower buds are typically produced at every other node on new growth near branch tips. An increase in the number of branch tips (branching frequency) could possibly increase flower bud and fruit production. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of three concentrations of Benzyladenine (BA), Gibberellin4+7 (GA), and Promalin (a mixture of BA and GA) on branching and flower production of three jojoba clones. Treatments involving pinching and untreated control plants were also included. The growth regulators had a significant effect on both branching and flower bud production, and clones differed in their response. For the most responsive clone, the most effective treatments (100 ppm GA and 100 ppm Promalin) resulted in 133% and 110% increase in flower buds after 17 months, respectively. The increase in flower buds was associated with an increase in the number of growing tips and node production. Similar responses were observed in both greenhouse and field experiments. The results of these studies indicate that growth regulators can be used to significantly increase flower bud production on jojoba.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Agronomy.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Plant Culture.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPalzkill, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341236en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2633091xen_US
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