The last resort: Tourism, growth, and values in twentieth-century Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291521
Title:
The last resort: Tourism, growth, and values in twentieth-century Arizona
Author:
Klein, Kerwin Lee, 1961-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 1950s Arizona, manufacturing and tourism replaced mining and agriculture as the leading sources of revenue in the state. Yet the images of Arizona found in the popular media emphasize rural vistas and rugged individualism. Arizona's success as a consumer commodity is based on the endurance of stylized "frontier" images. The endurance of these images, apart from their popularity with affluent Anglo-American consumers, rests on Arizona's preservation of cultural landscapes associated with the mythic past: the public lands, the Indian Reservations, and the Arizona-Sonora border. Boosters and consumers alike have emphasized the cultural and environmental differentiation that these borders or frontiers are seen as protecting. Since consumer preconceptions of Arizona are as varied as the consumers themselves, this celebration of difference poses difficulties for Arizona's pluralistic society.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; History, United States.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weiner, Douglas R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe last resort: Tourism, growth, and values in twentieth-century Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorKlein, Kerwin Lee, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Kerwin Lee, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 1950s Arizona, manufacturing and tourism replaced mining and agriculture as the leading sources of revenue in the state. Yet the images of Arizona found in the popular media emphasize rural vistas and rugged individualism. Arizona's success as a consumer commodity is based on the endurance of stylized "frontier" images. The endurance of these images, apart from their popularity with affluent Anglo-American consumers, rests on Arizona's preservation of cultural landscapes associated with the mythic past: the public lands, the Indian Reservations, and the Arizona-Sonora border. Boosters and consumers alike have emphasized the cultural and environmental differentiation that these borders or frontiers are seen as protecting. Since consumer preconceptions of Arizona are as varied as the consumers themselves, this celebration of difference poses difficulties for Arizona's pluralistic society.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWeiner, Douglas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341830en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26429706en_US
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