Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291510
Title:
Cold tolerance in Sonoran Desert Drosophilaspecies
Author:
Cleaves, Lawrence
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I examined resistance to cold temperature in seven Drosophila species from different habitats to determine the lower limits of cold tolerance. Three separate tests were administered to measure the: (1) response to a cold-shock exposure; (2) extent to which a short-term survival strategy, rapid cold hardening, was utilized by each species; and (3) degree to which each species would respond to a prolonged exposure at 0°C. As expected, the temperate-montane species, D. pseudoobscura, was the most cold-tolerant, whereas the least cold-tolerant was the tropical species, D. paulistorum. The two cosmopolitan species, D. hydei and D. melanogaster, and the three Sonoran Desert endemic species, D. mojavensis, D. nigrospiracula, and D. mettleri, demonstrated intermediate levels of cold-tolerance. Of the five species tested for rapid cold hardening, all exhibited the response, including the tropical representative. The results for the 0°C test paralleled the results of the cold shock test. The desert species tested proved surprisingly cold-tolerant, especially D. mojavensis.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Markow, Therese

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCold tolerance in Sonoran Desert Drosophilaspeciesen_US
dc.creatorCleaves, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorCleaves, Lawrenceen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI examined resistance to cold temperature in seven Drosophila species from different habitats to determine the lower limits of cold tolerance. Three separate tests were administered to measure the: (1) response to a cold-shock exposure; (2) extent to which a short-term survival strategy, rapid cold hardening, was utilized by each species; and (3) degree to which each species would respond to a prolonged exposure at 0°C. As expected, the temperate-montane species, D. pseudoobscura, was the most cold-tolerant, whereas the least cold-tolerant was the tropical species, D. paulistorum. The two cosmopolitan species, D. hydei and D. melanogaster, and the three Sonoran Desert endemic species, D. mojavensis, D. nigrospiracula, and D. mettleri, demonstrated intermediate levels of cold-tolerance. Of the five species tested for rapid cold hardening, all exhibited the response, including the tropical representative. The results for the 0°C test paralleled the results of the cold shock test. The desert species tested proved surprisingly cold-tolerant, especially D. mojavensis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistry and Molecular Biophysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarkow, Thereseen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1409486en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42812203en_US
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