Evaluating approaches for monitoring terrestrial vertebrates in United States national parks: An example from Tonto National Park Monument, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291508
Title:
Evaluating approaches for monitoring terrestrial vertebrates in United States national parks: An example from Tonto National Park Monument, Arizona
Author:
Swann, Donald Edward
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I evaluated different approaches for monitoring of amphibians, reptiles, and mammals in national parks based on data from Tonto National Monument, Arizona, and 3 criteria: statistical power, cost, and ability to meet monitoring goals. Detecting a declining trend in abundance (18% over 10 years) with 80% power would require approximately 65 person-days of annual sampling for the 2 most common rodents, and 110 person-days for the 2 most common lizards. Detecting this trend in species richness of terrestrial vertebrates (reptiles, amphibians, and mammals) would require only 30 person-days annually. Monitoring abundances of vertebrates is often recommended for parks, but my study suggests that this approach is too expensive for most parks, and results may be inadequate for achieving agency goals of monitoring biological diversity. I advocate use of species richness in monitoring, and provide field and analytical methods for estimating this parameter.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Biostatistics.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwalbe, Cecil R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvaluating approaches for monitoring terrestrial vertebrates in United States national parks: An example from Tonto National Park Monument, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorSwann, Donald Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorSwann, Donald Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI evaluated different approaches for monitoring of amphibians, reptiles, and mammals in national parks based on data from Tonto National Monument, Arizona, and 3 criteria: statistical power, cost, and ability to meet monitoring goals. Detecting a declining trend in abundance (18% over 10 years) with 80% power would require approximately 65 person-days of annual sampling for the 2 most common rodents, and 110 person-days for the 2 most common lizards. Detecting this trend in species richness of terrestrial vertebrates (reptiles, amphibians, and mammals) would require only 30 person-days annually. Monitoring abundances of vertebrates is often recommended for parks, but my study suggests that this approach is too expensive for most parks, and results may be inadequate for achieving agency goals of monitoring biological diversity. I advocate use of species richness in monitoring, and provide field and analytical methods for estimating this parameter.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Biostatistics.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwalbe, Cecil R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1394138en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3956812xen_US
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